KICP in the News, 2004



 
Fred Kavli, Kavli Foundation donate $7.5 million to University of Chicago for cosmological physics institute
University of Chicago, Press Release, March 10, 2004
University of Chicago, Press Release

The University of Chicago will devote $7.5 million in donations from Fred Kavli and the Kavli Foundation of Oxnard, Calif., to studying some of the most puzzling scientific questions about the origin and evolution of the universe and the laws that govern it.

The funds will make permanent the Center for Cosmological Physics, established in 2001 by the National Science Foundation. The center will be renamed the Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics. The new institute is one of seven being established by Kavli around the country and in Europe on brain science, nanoscience and cosmology.

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Evidence of "dark energy"
Newsday, May 19, 2004
Newsday

Prof. Michael Turner on new evidence of the expanding universe.

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KICP Members: Michael S. Turner
 
Key theory of galaxy formation no longer conflicts with observations
Press Release, University of Chicago, June 9, 2004
Press Release, University of Chicago

Astrophysicists led by the University of Chicago's Andrey Kravtsov have resolved an embarrassing contradiction between a favored theory of how galaxies form and what astronomers see in their telescopes.

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KICP Members: Andrey V. Kravtsov
 
Milky Way's "Satellite Problem" Solved
Scientific American, June 14, 2004
by Michael Schirber, Scientific American

Our Milky Way galaxy is surrounded by a dozen smaller orbiting galaxies. The size of this cosmic neighborhood has perplexed astrophysicists for some time because the currently favored theory of galaxy formation predicts 10 times as many satellites. But new computer simulations run by Andrey Kravtsov of the University of Chicago and his colleagues have shown that the relative paucity of Milky Way companions may not be such a concern after all.

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KICP Members: Andrey V. Kravtsov
 
KICP Faculty Sean Carroll and Graduate Student Jennifer Chen propose alternative to Big Bang
Chicago Sun-Times, September 15, 2004
Chicago Sun-Times

"The Big Bang may have been smaller than we suspect. That's the intriguing conclusion of two researchers at the University of Chicago who ponder the mysteries surrounding the origin of the universe. (BY SANDRA GUY SUN-TIMES COLUMNIST )"

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KICP Members: Sean M. Carroll
KICP Students: Jennifer Chen
 
Scientists zero in on why time flows in one direction
News Office, The University of Chicago, November 1, 2004
News Office, The University of Chicago

By Steve Koppes, News Office

The big bang could be a normal event in the natural evolution of the universe that will happen repeatedly over incredibly vast time scales as the universe expands, empties out and cools off, according to two University of Chicago physicists.

'We like to say that the big bang is nothing special in the history of our universe,' said Sean Carroll, an Assistant Professor in Physics at the University of Chicago. Carroll and University of Chicago graduate student Jennifer Chen will electronically publish a paper describing their ideas at http://arxiv.org/.

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Related Links:
KICP Members: Sean M. Carroll
KICP Students: Jennifer Chen