KICP Seminars & Colloquia, Current and Future
Upcoming Seminars

Seminar schedule for Current (Spring 2014) & Future Quarters
April 2, 2014
Wednesday colloquium
Rick Kessler
The University of Chicago
A Tale of Two Collaborations: A New Precise Measurement of Cosmological Parameters Using Type Ia Supernovae   [PDF]
April 3, 2014
Open Group seminar
Pablo Saz Parkinson
UC Santa Cruz
Searching for the highest energy emission from pulsars with Fermi and HAWC
April 4, 2014
Friday noon seminar
Meng Su
MIT
Excess of Diffuse Gamma-ray Emission from the Inner Galaxy: Bubbles, Jets, and Dark Matter   [Abstract]
April 9, 2014
Astronomy colloquium
Rebecca Bernstein
Carnegie Observatories
The GMT Project: Science and Status   [Abstract]
April 11, 2014
Friday noon seminar
Jens Chluba
JHU
Science with CMB Spectral Distortions: a New Window to Early-Universe Physics   [Abstract]
April 16, 2014
Wednesday colloquium
cancelled
Daniel Akerib
Case Western Reserve University
Do WIMPs Rule? The LUX Experiment and the Search for Cosmic Dark Matter   [Abstract]
April 18, 2014
Friday noon seminar
Yashar Hezaveh
Stanford University
Measuring the Power Spectrum of Dark Matter Substructure with Gravitational Lensing   [Abstract]
April 22, 2014
Astronomy colloquium
Daniel Huber
NASA
TBA   [Abstract]
April 30, 2014
Wednesday colloquium
Tim M.P. Tait
UC Irvine
Hunting for Particle Dark Matter
May 2, 2014
Friday noon seminar
Hironao Miyatake
Princeton University
The Weak Lensing Signal and Clustering of SDSS-III CMASS Galaxies
May 7, 2014
Astronomy colloquium
Fausto Cattaneo
University of Chicago
TBA
May 9, 2014
Friday noon seminar
Veronica Bindi
University of Hawaii
AMS-02 latest results
May 16, 2014
Friday noon seminar
Sarah Burke Spolaor
California Institute of Technology
The Light and Gravity of Supermassive Black Hole Binaries
May 21, 2014
Wednesday colloquium
Gabriele Veneziano
College de France
TBA   [Abstract]
May 23, 2014
Friday noon seminar
Pablo Mosteiro
Princeton University
First measurement of pp neutrinos in real time in the Borexino detector
May 28, 2014
Astronomy colloquium
Shri Kulkarni
California Institute of Technology
TBA
May 30, 2014
Friday noon seminar
Cecilia Lunardini
Arizona State University
Neutrino astrophysics and the low and high energy frontier
June 4, 2014
Astronomy colloquium
Heather Knutson
California Institute of Technology
TBA
June 6, 2014
Friday noon seminar
Renee Hlozek
Princeton University
Planck Data Reconsidered
 
Wednesday colloquia
KICP Wednesday Colloquia: Unless otherwise noted, all talks are held in BSLC 115 at 3:00 PM on Wednesdays. A reception will be held in the LASR conference room following the talk.

  • April 2, 2014 | 3:00 PM | BSLC 115
    A Tale of Two Collaborations: A New Precise Measurement of Cosmological Parameters Using Type Ia Supernovae
    Rick Kessler, The University of Chicago
    Note: Wine and cheese will follow talk. Wine and cheese will be held in LASR.

    A Tale of Two Collaborations: A New Precise Measurement of Cosmological Parameters Using Type Ia Supernovae
    PDF
  • April 16, 2014 | 3:00 PM | BSLC 115
    CANCELLED
    Do WIMPs Rule? The LUX Experiment and the Search for Cosmic Dark Matter
    Daniel Akerib, Case Western Reserve University
    Note: Reception at 4:00 PM in the LASR Conference room.

    Photo credit: Matt Kapust, Sanford Underground Research Facility
    The search for dark matter in the form of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, or WIMPs, has been ongoing for nearly thirty years. Steady progress has been made through the development and use of novel particle detectors aimed at low energy threshold and low radioactive backgrounds. After touching on the cosmological and astrophysical underpinnings, I will discuss the experimental challenges in searching for WIMPs and how we are attempting to meet them with the LUX experiment. LUX, the Large Underground Xenon experiment, is a time projection chamber that uses 250 kg of liquified xenon as a WIMP target. The detector is housed in the Sanford Underground Research Facility at the former Homestake goldmine in South Dakota. I will report on the first science run, which was completed in 2013, as well as upcoming plans. I will also describe the proposed follow-up LZ experiment, to be carried out by a merger of the LUX and Zeplin-3 collaborations.
  • April 30, 2014 | 3:00 PM | BSLC 115
    Hunting for Particle Dark Matter
    Tim M.P. Tait, UC Irvine
    Note: Reception at 4:00 PM in the LASR Conference room.
  • May 21, 2014 | 3:00 PM | BSLC 109
    TBA
    Gabriele Veneziano, College de France

    TBA

 
Friday noon seminars

  • April 4, 2014 | 12:00 PM | LASR Conference Room
    Excess of Diffuse Gamma-ray Emission from the Inner Galaxy: Bubbles, Jets, and Dark Matter
    Meng Su, MIT

    Excess of Diffuse Gamma-ray Emission from the Inner Galaxy: Bubbles, Jets, and Dark Matter
    Our analysis of data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope revealed a pair of large gamma-ray bubble structures, named the Fermi bubbles, each extending ~10 kpc above and below the Galactic center. I will present new results using five years Fermi-LAT data and multi-wavelength observations of the Fermi bubbles in X-ray, microwave, and radio, including updates from dedicated observations. New observations help us to distinguish hadronic from leptonic origin of the cosmic-ray electrons emitting gamma-ray/radio emission, and constrain the magnetic field within the Fermi bubbles. I will also show our numerical simulations which demonstrate that the bubble structure could be evidence for past accretion events and outflow from the central supermassive black hole. Furthermore, we recently found gamma-ray evidence for large-scale collimated jet-like structure penetrating through the bubbles from the Galactic center, which might provide further evidence of a past activity in the Galactic center. We have proposed to change the survey strategy of Fermi to increase the exposure at the inner Galaxy by more than a factor of 2. This new survey strategy has been initiated since December 2013 and will last for at least one year. I will end up with a discussion of future gamma-ray space missions.
  • April 11, 2014 | 12:00 PM | LASR Conference Room
    Science with CMB Spectral Distortions: a New Window to Early-Universe Physics
    Jens Chluba, JHU

    Science with CMB Spectral Distortions: a New Window to Early-Universe Physics
    Since COBE/FIRAS we know that the CMB spectrum is extremely close to a perfect blackbody. There are, however, a number of processes in the early Universe that should create spectral distortions at a level that is within reach of present day technology. I will give an overview of recent theoretical and experimental developments, explaining why future measurements of the CMB spectrum will open up an unexplored window to early-universe and particle physics, with possible non-standard surprises but also guaranteed signals awaiting us.
  • April 18, 2014 | 12:00 PM | LASR Conference Room
    Measuring the Power Spectrum of Dark Matter Substructure with Gravitational Lensing
    Yashar Hezaveh, Stanford University

    Measuring the Power Spectrum of Dark Matter Substructure with Gravitational Lensing
    The abundance of substructure within dark matter halos surrounding galaxies has been an area of intensive study for over a decade. Quantifying the small-scale structure of dark matter halos, which is influenced by the spectrum of primordial density fluctuations and the micro-physics of dark matter, can allow us to probe multiple areas of fundamental physics. Observationally, however, very little is known about the true abundance and the structure of dark matter sub-halos. In this talk, I will discuss the promising prospects of using ALMA and the recently discovered populations of strong gravitational lenses in mm/submm-wave surveys (SPT, Herschel, ACT, Planck) for mapping the small-scale structure of galaxy halos. In particular, I will show that we can measure the power spectrum of dark matter substructure by analyzing the correlations in perturbations of strongly lensed images. I will show that the large number of discovered lenses and the spectacular power of ALMA paint a bright future for a robust characterization of the small-scale structure of dark matter halos.
  • May 2, 2014 | 12:00 PM | LASR Conference Room
    The Weak Lensing Signal and Clustering of SDSS-III CMASS Galaxies
    Hironao Miyatake, Princeton University
  • May 9, 2014 | 12:00 PM | LASR Conference Room
    AMS-02 latest results
    Veronica Bindi, University of Hawaii
  • May 16, 2014 | 12:00 PM | LASR Conference Room
    The Light and Gravity of Supermassive Black Hole Binaries
    Sarah Burke Spolaor, California Institute of Technology
  • May 23, 2014 | 12:00 PM | LASR Conference Room
    First measurement of pp neutrinos in real time in the Borexino detector
    Pablo Mosteiro, Princeton University
  • May 30, 2014 | 12:00 PM | LASR Conference Room
    Neutrino astrophysics and the low and high energy frontier
    Cecilia Lunardini, Arizona State University
  • June 6, 2014 | 12:00 PM | LASR Conference Room
    Planck Data Reconsidered
    Renee Hlozek, Princeton University

 
Special seminars


 
Open group seminars

  • April 3, 2014 | 2:00 PM | LASR Conference Room
    Searching for the highest energy emission from pulsars with Fermi and HAWC
    Pablo Saz Parkinson, UC Santa Cruz

 
Thursday lunch discussions
KICP's Thunch: KICP Cosmology Lunch (Thunch) Weekly on Thursdays, Noon, LASR 152 (Conference Room).

Please join us for an informal lunch discussion, led by KICP fellows, of recent news and papers in cosmology. Topics range from experiment and observations to theory in all areas of KICP science. To submit or view papers for this week's Thunch please visit the Thunch website.


 
Astronomy colloquia

  • April 9, 2014 | 3:00 PM | BSLC 115
    The GMT Project: Science and Status
    Rebecca Bernstein, Carnegie Observatories
    Note: Refreshments served at 4PM, LASR

    The GMT Project: Science and Status
    In this talk, I will give an overview of the GMT project and the science cases and goals that are driving its design. I will also describe the current status of the project and the first generation instruments that are now under development.
  • April 22, 2014 | 3:00 PM | BSLC 115
    TBA
    Daniel Huber, NASA

    Asteroseismology - the study of stellar oscillations - is a powerful observational tool to probe the structure and evolution of stars. In addition to the large number of newly discovered exoplanets, the Kepler space telescope has revolutionized asteroseismology by detecting oscillations in thousands of stars from the main-sequence to the red-giant branch. In this talk I will highlight recent asteroseismic discoveries by Kepler, focusing in particular on studies of exoplanet host stars and the application of asteroseismology to measure stellar spin-orbit inclinations. I will furthermore discuss current efforts to improve fundamental properties (such as temperatures, masses, and radii) of Kepler targets, and their importance for deriving accurate planet occurrence rates using the Kepler sample. Finally, I will give a brief overview on first results by Kepler's ecliptic plane follow-up mission, K2.
  • May 7, 2014 | 3:00 PM | BSLC 115
    TBA
    Fausto Cattaneo, University of Chicago
  • May 28, 2014 | 3:00 PM | BSLC 115
    TBA
    Shri Kulkarni, California Institute of Technology
  • June 4, 2014 | 3:00 PM | BSLC 115
    TBA
    Heather Knutson, California Institute of Technology