KICP Seminars & Colloquia, Current and Future
Upcoming Seminars

Seminar schedule for Current (Spring 2017) & Future Quarters
March 29, 2017
Astronomy Colloquium
Steinn Sigurdsson
Penn State
How Black Holes get their Kicks: Dynamical Evolution and Coalescence   [Abstract]
March 31, 2017
Friday noon seminar
Alessandro Manzotti
University of Chicago
Delensing CMB B-modes: results from SPT   [Abstract]
April 11, 2017
Astronomy Tuesday Seminar
Farhad Yusef-Zadeh
Northwestern
TBA
April 12, 2017
Astronomy Colloquium
Hsiao-Wen Chen
University of Chicago
TBA
April 26, 2017
Astronomy Colloquium
Nergis Mavalvala
MIT
First results from LIGO: past, present and future   [Abstract]
May 3, 2017
Astronomy Colloquium
Erik Shirokoff
University of Chicago
TBA
May 10, 2017
Astronomy Colloquium
Marc Kamionkowski
Johns Hopkins
TBA
 
WEDNESDAY COLLOQUIA
KICP Wednesday Colloquia: Unless otherwise noted, all talks are held in ERC 161 at 3:30 PM on Wednesdays. A reception will be held in the ERC 401 following the talk.


 
FRIDAY NOON SEMINARS
KICP Friday noon seminar: Unless otherwise noted, all talks are held in ERC 401 at Noon on Fridays.

  • March 31, 2017 | 12:00 PM | ERC 401
    Delensing CMB B-modes: results from SPT
    Alessandro Manzotti, University of Chicago

    A promising signature of cosmic inflation is the presence of a "B-mode" component in the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) induced by primordial gravitational waves. For many inflation models, this B-mode signal is predicted to be at a level detectable in the near future. However current searches are limited by a "lensing B-mode" component that is produced by gravitationally lensing primordial E modes. In order to potentially detect the inflationary signal from B-mode measurements, lensing B modes must be characterized and removed in a process referred to as "delensing." This process has been studied extensively theoretically and with simulations, but has not been performed on polarization data. In this talk, I will present a demonstration of CMB B-mode delensing using polarization data from the South Pole Telescope polarimeter, SPTpol. Furthermore, using realistic simulations that include filtering and realistic CMB noise, we will show what is currently limiting the delensing efficiency and how it will rapidly improve in the near future.

 
SPECIAL SEMINARS


 
OPEN GROUP SEMINARS


 
THURSDAY LUNCH DISCUSSIONS
KICP's Thunch: KICP Cosmology Lunch (Thunch) Weekly on Thursdays, Noon, ERC 401A.

Please join us for an informal lunch discussion, led by KICP fellows, of recent news and papers in cosmology. Topics range from experiment and observations to theory in all areas of KICP science. To submit or view papers for this week's Thunch please visit the Thunch website.


 
ASTRONOMY COLLOQUIA
Colloquia of the Department of Astronomy & Astrophysics: Unless otherwise noted, all talks are held in ERC 161 at 3:30 PM on Wednesdays. A reception will be held in Hubble Lounge (ERC 501) following the talk.

  • March 29, 2017 | 3:30 PM | ERC 161
    How Black Holes get their Kicks: Dynamical Evolution and Coalescence
    Steinn Sigurdsson, Penn State
    Note: Refreshments served at 4:45 PM, Hubble Lounge

    Recent observations have increased interest in the possibilities of a significant population of black hole binaries in the local universe. Natal kicks may play a crucial role in the merger rate of stellar mass black holes. Dynamical evolution can lead to an enhanced interaction rate for compact binaries in dense stellar systems and a distinct and richer population of compact binaries. I discuss some of the issues related to black hole binary formation and coalescence, the issue of retention in globular clusters and possible contribution to the LIGO rate.
  • April 12, 2017 | 3:30 PM | ERC 161
    TBA
    Hsiao-Wen Chen, University of Chicago
    Note: Refreshments served at 4:45 PM, Hubble Lounge
  • April 26, 2017 | 3:30 PM | ERC 161
    First results from LIGO: past, present and future
    Nergis Mavalvala, MIT
    Note: Refreshments served at 4:30 PM, Hubble Lounge

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) detected gravitational waves for the first time in 2015. Since then there have been a couple more detections of binary black hole mergers. I will discuss the instruments that made these discoveries, the science so far, and plans for future improvements and upgrades to LIGO.
  • May 3, 2017 | 3:30 PM | ERC 161
    TBA
    Erik Shirokoff, University of Chicago
    Note: Refreshments served at 4:45 PM, Hubble Lounge
  • May 10, 2017 | 3:30 PM | ERC 161
    TBA
    Marc Kamionkowski, Johns Hopkins
    Note: Refreshments served at 4:45 PM, Hubble Lounge

 
ASTRONOMY TUESDAY SEMINARS

  • April 11, 2017 | 12:00 PM | ERC 501
    TBA
    Farhad Yusef-Zadeh, Northwestern
    Note: Refreshments served at 4:30 PM, Hubble Lounge

 
ASTRONOMY SPECIAL SEMINARS