KICP Seminars & Colloquia, Current and Future

Seminar schedule for Current (Summer 2016) & Future Quarters
June 27, 2016
Astronomy Special Seminar
Mitsunori Araki
Tokyo University of Science, Japan
Detection of CH3CN in a Diffuse Cloud by Hot Axis Effect indicating its coexistence with C60+, a carrier of Diffuse Interstellar Bands   [Abstract]
July 6, 2016
Open Group seminar
Oleg Ruchayskiy
Niels Bohr Institute
MHD description of chiral relativistic plasma
 
WEDNESDAY COLLOQUIA
KICP Wednesday Colloquia: Unless otherwise noted, all talks are held in ERC 161 at 3:30 PM on Wednesdays. A reception will be held in the ERC 161 following the talk.


 
FRIDAY NOON SEMINARS
KICP Friday noon seminar: Unless otherwise noted, all talks are held in ERC 401 at Noon on Fridays.


 
SPECIAL SEMINARS


 
OPEN GROUP SEMINARS

  • July 6, 2016 | 2:00 PM | ERC 401
    MHD description of chiral relativistic plasma
    Oleg Ruchayskiy, Niels Bohr Institute

 
THURSDAY LUNCH DISCUSSIONS
KICP's Thunch: KICP Cosmology Lunch (Thunch) Weekly on Thursdays, Noon, ERC 401A.

Please join us for an informal lunch discussion, led by KICP fellows, of recent news and papers in cosmology. Topics range from experiment and observations to theory in all areas of KICP science. To submit or view papers for this week's Thunch please visit the Thunch website.


 
ASTRONOMY COLLOQUIA
Colloquia of the Department of Astronomy & Astrophysics: Unless otherwise noted, all talks are held in ERC 161 at 3:30 PM on Wednesdays. A reception will be held in Astro Lounge (ERC 501) following the talk.


 
ASTRONOMY TUESDAY SEMINARS


 
ASTRONOMY SPECIAL SEMINARS

  • June 27, 2016 | 12:00 PM | ERC 545
    Detection of CH3CN in a Diffuse Cloud by Hot Axis Effect indicating its coexistence with C60+, a carrier of Diffuse Interstellar Bands
    Mitsunori Araki, Tokyo University of Science, Japan

    Diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) are optical absorption lines by molecules in diffuse cloud. Initially observed more than 100 years ago, they still remain the longest standing unsolved problem in spectroscopy and astrochemistry, although five DIBs have recently been identified as due to fullerene ion C60+. Identifications of DIBs are important because they can give us information for chemical composition in space. To identify carrier molecules of DIBs we have measured DIB candidate molecules produced in the laboratory to compare their absorption spectra with astronomically observed DIB spectra. In this talk, I first present our latest results on the search for the thiophenoxy radical C6H5S by using our cavity ringdown spectrometer. I then present a new insight into diffuse clouds. Molecules in diffuse clouds are collisionally heated and radiatively cooled. Due to the spectroscopic selection rules, acetonitrile CH3CN is cooled well for the end-over-end rotation but is not cooled for rotation around its molecular axis. We made a model of this peculiar rotation as "Hot Axis Effect." Based on this model, we estimated a rotational absorption spectrum of CH3CN in the radio frequency region. By using Nobeyama 45 m radio telescope, the absorption line was detected in the diffuse cloud in front of Orion molecular cloud. Absorption lines of the fullerene have also been reported in this diffuse cloud. Thus we found that CH3CN coexists with C60+ in this diffuse cloud.