KICP Seminars & Colloquia, Current and Future
Today's Seminar
Upcoming Seminars

Seminar schedule for Current (Fall 2014) & Future Quarters
October 1, 2014
Wednesday colloquium
Daniel Holz
University of Chicago
Gravitational wave astrophysics with LIGO   [Abstract]
October 3, 2014
Friday noon seminar
Anja von der Linden
DARK + KIPAC
Weighing the Giants: Accurate Weak Lensing Mass Measurements for Cosmological Cluster Surveys   [Abstract]
October 8, 2014
Astronomy colloquium
Jacob Bean
University of Chicago
Exoplanets in HD   [Abstract]
October 10, 2014
Friday noon seminar
Raquel H Ribeiro
Case Western Reserve University
Effective field theories for cosmic acceleration   [Abstract]
October 15, 2014
Wednesday colloquium
Daniel Chung
University of Wisconsin, Madison
TBA   [Abstract]
October 17, 2014
Friday noon seminar
Claude-Andre Faucher-Giguere
Northwestern University
Feedback-regulated star formation on galactic and cosmological scales   [Abstract]
October 22, 2014
Wednesday colloquium
Rashid Sunyaev
Max-Planck Institute for Astrophysics
Two milestones in the history of the Universe: last scattering surface and black body photosphere of the Universe.
October 24, 2014
Friday noon seminar
Beth A Reid
UC Berkeley
TBD
October 31, 2014
Friday noon seminar
Esra Bulbul
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
The Curious Case of the 3.57 keV Emission Line   [Abstract]
November 7, 2014
Friday noon seminar
Benjamin R. Safdi
MIT
Directional Detection of the Cosmic Neutrino Background
November 11, 2014
Open Group seminar
Daan Meerburg
Johns Hopkins University
TBA   [Abstract]
November 14, 2014
Friday noon seminar
Anna Franckowiak
SLAC / KIPAC
The Fermi bubbles
November 21, 2014
Friday noon seminar
Liang Dai
Johns Hopkins University
TBD
December 12, 2014
Friday noon seminar
Brendan Crill
Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Results from Planck 2014
June 16, 2016
Open Group seminar
David N Spergel
Princeton University
Toward an Understanding of Foreground Emission in the BICEP2 Region (placeholder)
 
Wednesday colloquia
KICP Wednesday Colloquia: Unless otherwise noted, all talks are held in BSLC 001 at 3 PM on Wednesdays. A reception will be held in the LASR conference room following the talk.

  • October 1, 2014 | 3:00 PM | BSLC 115
    Gravitational wave astrophysics with LIGO
    Daniel Holz, University of Chicago
    Note: Cheese & Wine Reception will follow talk in the LASR Conference Room

    Gravitational wave astrophysics with LIGO
    Gravitational waves were first predicted by Einstein almost a century ago, and the Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (LIGO) should be finally on the verge of directly detecting these waves. The most likely sources are the inspirals and mergers of stellar mass binary systems, such as pairs of neutron stars and/or black holes. In addition to being extraordinarily loud in gravitational waves, these coalescences may be associated with short gamma-ray bursts, and thus hold out the promise of multi-messenger astronomy: combining gravitational wave and electromagnetic observations to elucidate the physics and astrophysics of the sources. We present estimates for the event rate of binary systems, showing that LIGO can expect the first detections within months of operation. We examine the sky localization of LIGO sources, and explore some of the results that can be expected from gravitational wave astronomy, including shedding light on the process of black hole formation and precision measurements of the Hubble constant. We also discuss the loudest gravitational wave sources, and the potential to use these for internal calibration as well as for science. The era of gravitational-wave astronomy is rapidly approaching; a revolutionary new probe of our Universe awaits.
  • October 15, 2014 | 3:00 PM | BSLC 001
    TBA
    Daniel Chung, University of Wisconsin, Madison
    Note: Cheese & Wine Reception will follow talk in the LASR Conference Room

    TBA
  • October 22, 2014 | 3:00 PM | BSLC 001
    Two milestones in the history of the Universe: last scattering surface and black body photosphere of the Universe.
    Rashid Sunyaev, Max-Planck Institute for Astrophysics
    Note: Reception at 4:00 PM in the LASR Conference room.

 
Friday noon seminars
KICP Friday noon seminar: Unless otherwise noted, all talks are held in LASR conference room at Noon on Fridays.

  • October 3, 2014 | 12:00 PM | LASR Conference Room
    Weighing the Giants: Accurate Weak Lensing Mass Measurements for Cosmological Cluster Surveys
    Anja von der Linden, DARK + KIPAC

    Surveys of galaxy clusters provide a sensitive probe of cosmology by measuring the evolution of the halo mass function. With a number of surveys at optical, millimeter, and X-ray wavelengths on-going or starting in the near futures, cluster count experiments will be one the most important cosmological probes over the next decade. However, none of the typical survey observables (X-ray luminosity, optical richness, SZ flux) directly measures the cluster mass. Already current cluster surveys are systematically limited by uncertainties in the relation between cluster mass and observables. Cluster weak lensing is the most promising observational method to calibrate the mass scaling to the required precision, but requires the control of systematic errors to a a few percent each. I will review our "Weighing the Giants" project to measure accurate individual weak lensing masses for the largest sample of clusters to date, and discuss its first cosmological applications for cluster count experiments as well as the baryonic mass fraction test.
  • October 10, 2014 | 12:00 PM | LASR Conference Room
    Effective field theories for cosmic acceleration
    Raquel H Ribeiro, Case Western Reserve University

    In this era of precision cosmology we are relying more than ever on our theories to decode observations. Models phrased in an Effective Field Theory (EFT) language are particularly useful, since they rely on the existence of a decoupling limit which makes the low energy physics phenomena largely independent of short distance physics. Why is such description desirable? It means we don't need to know the full behaviour of the theory, but only its low energy limit to make predictions for observables at the scale of the experiment we are interested in. In this talk I will discuss a different reorganisation of EFTs describing single-field models for cosmic acceleration (in the early and late universe) with large derivative interactions. The decoupling limit in these theories relies on a derivative hierarchy, rather than a hierarchy between energy scales. Examples include Dirac--Born--Infeld inflation and galileon models in the context of modified gravity. I will discuss the criterion of predictivity of these theories and identify the scales up to which the predictions of these theories are reliable to decode observational data.
  • October 17, 2014 | 12:00 PM | LASR Conference Room
    Feedback-regulated star formation on galactic and cosmological scales
    Claude-Andre Faucher-Giguere, Northwestern University

    A central problem in galaxy formation is to understand why star formation is so inefficient. Within individual galaxies, gas is converted into stars at a rate two orders of magnitude slower than unimpeded gravitational collapse predicts, a fact embodied in the low normalization of the observed Kennicutt-Schmidt (K-S) relationship between star formation rate surface density and gas surface density. Star formation in galaxies is also globally inefficient in the sense that the stellar mass in dark matter halos is a small fraction of the universal baryon fraction. I will show that these two facts can be explained by the self-regulation of star formation by feedback from massive stars. Within galaxies, stellar feedback drives turbulence that supports the interstellar medium against collapse and the K-S law is set by the low strength of gravity relative to stellar feedback. The energy input from the same stellar feedback processes drive powerful galactic outflows that remove most of the gas accreted from the intergalactic medium before it has time to turn into stars. Using cosmological hydrodynamical simulations from our FIRE project ("Feedback In Realistic Environments"), I will show that gas removal by star formation-driven galactic winds successfully explains the observed galaxy stellar mass function, at least for galaxies less massive than the Milky Way, and discuss the observational signatures of circum-galactic gas flows. Feedback from massive black holes may be required to explain the quenching of galaxies much more massive than the Milky Way.
  • October 24, 2014 | 12:00 PM | LASR Conference Room
    TBD
    Beth A Reid, UC Berkeley
  • October 31, 2014 | 12:00 PM | LASR Conference Room
    The Curious Case of the 3.57 keV Emission Line
    Esra Bulbul, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

    We recently detected an unidentified emission line at 3.57 keV in the Chandra observations of the Perseus cluster and the stacked XMM-Newton observations of 73 galaxy clusters. This line was detected at >3sigma statistical significance in five independent samples of XMM-Newton. The lack of any atomic transitions at this energy in thermal plasma, hints that the line could be a signature of decaying sterile neutrinos. I will discuss the search for this line in the stacked observations of galaxy clusters and provide an update on active searches for this feature in other dark matter rich astrophysical systems.
  • November 7, 2014 | 12:00 PM | LASR Conference Room
    Directional Detection of the Cosmic Neutrino Background
    Benjamin R. Safdi, MIT
  • November 14, 2014 | 12:00 PM | LASR Conference Room
    The Fermi bubbles
    Anna Franckowiak, SLAC / KIPAC
  • November 21, 2014 | 12:00 PM | LASR Conference Room
    TBD
    Liang Dai, Johns Hopkins University
  • December 12, 2014 | 12:00 PM | LASR Conference Room
    Results from Planck 2014
    Brendan Crill, Jet Propulsion Laboratory

 
Special seminars


 
Open group seminars

  • November 11, 2014 | 1:00 PM | LASR Conference Room
    TBA
    Daan Meerburg, Johns Hopkins University

    TBA
  • June 16, 2016 | |
    Toward an Understanding of Foreground Emission in the BICEP2 Region (placeholder)
    David N Spergel, Princeton University

 
Thursday lunch discussions
KICP's Thunch: KICP Cosmology Lunch (Thunch) Weekly on Thursdays, Noon, LASR conference room.

Please join us for an informal lunch discussion, led by KICP fellows, of recent news and papers in cosmology. Topics range from experiment and observations to theory in all areas of KICP science. To submit or view papers for this week's Thunch please visit the Thunch website.


 
Astronomy colloquia
Colloquia of the Department of Astronomy & Astrophysics: Unless otherwise noted, all talks are held in BSLC 001 at 3 PM on Wednesdays. A reception will be held in TAAC 71 following the talk.

  • October 8, 2014 | 3:00 PM | BSLC 001
    Exoplanets in HD
    Jacob Bean, University of Chicago
    Note: Refreshments served at 4 PM, TAAC 71

    Exoplanet surveys have revealed an amazing diversity of planets orbiting other stars in the last two decades. Studying the atmospheres of representative exoplanets is the key next step in leveraging these detections to further transform our understanding of planet formation and planetary physics. Additionally, atmospheric studies are critical for determining if any of the small habitable zone exoplanets that are now being detected are truly habitable, and even inhabited. In this talk I will describe a vision for how we can pursue the compelling opportunities in exoplanet atmospheres today and in the future. One crucial need in this area is spectroscopy to reveal planets in high definition. I will present new results from intensive observational campaigns with the Hubble Space Telescope that serve as a model for the proposed program, including a definitive constraint on the atmosphere of the super-Earth archetype GJ1214b, a precise measurement of the water abundance in a giant planet, and the inference of the thermal structure of an exoplanet atmosphere as a function of longitude. A fundamental component of the envisioned approach for the future is the need for a strategic program combining observations with multiple ground- and space-based telescopes using a suite of techniques to investigate the question of habitability. I will conclude by discussing how future facilities like the Giant Magellan Telescope are poised to play a crucial role in the identification of the first Earth twin as part of this plan.